Monthly Archives

April 2016

Brand Love: What Makes it Real?

By | Food for thought | No Comments

“During difficult economic times, consumers gravitate toward the brands they know, the brands they love and trust.” Muhtar Kent (CEO of The Coca-Cola Company)

It is difficult times and this quote by Muhtar Kent prompted us to explore what underpins Brand Love today – what makes it real?  Here’s what we came up with:

Brand Love What makes it RealLoyalty

“Brand loyalty does exist – up to a point. But it cannot be taken for granted.” Subbu Subramanyeswar, Publicis Ambience India

Consumer loyalty in South Africa is on the decline, particularly because for Generation Y (18-34) brand commitment has never really been a drive to purchase. But for consumers falling into the Baby Boomers and Gen X segments – loyalty is still a driving factor – unless the brand begins to deliver a bad product or service, they will keep going back.

Examples of local brands who market strongly to their audience loyalty are Volkswagen and Koo (Tiger Brands).

Brand Love What makes it RealRewards

“I am still a Smart Shopper – or I will be until I experience something that really changes my feelings about the brand.” Clive Evans, The Strategy Department

Rewards Programs and Loyalty Clubs in South Africa have shown significant growth in the last five years and the number of registered members has almost doubled since 2011. This translates into over 82 million registered programme members, meaning the average adult is signed up to at least three programs.

The top loyalty programmes in SA are PicknPay Smart Shopper, Woolworths WRewards and Clicks Club Card.

Brand Love What makes it RealQuality

 “Perhaps the most salient factor for the most successful brands is the promise of consistent quality.” Rosi McMurray, ED of Strategy, The Brand Union

In the digital era of brand naming and shaming online, no brand’s long term strategy can be sustainable without delivery on quality. Consumers hold all the cards and social activism has been gaining momentum since the dawn of social media. Brands have nowhere to hide.

For a sobering look at how big brands are faring WRT quality and service, here is the most complained-about companies in South Africa list.

Brand Love What makes it RealAgility

“Building a brand is about a thousand little new touches … Consistency is only for liars.” Eric Ryan

In the last ten years, major brands have lost market share to entrepreneurial brands who know how to be agile and to hustle – we call this the David and Goliath Syndrome.

No longer is their biggest competition the number one or number two brand in the category. Now, they’re threatened by the dreaded “all the other,” a collection of brands that often aren’t even listed by name on a market share report, because they’re viewed as too small to matter. Let’s be straight. They matter. Their strategy is agile and often more appealing to the competition.

A big brand that caught our eye doing something agile and hipster is Pepsi, who have just launched their “Artisanal Craft Soda” in the US. This “craft beverage” contains kola nut extract, certified fair trade sugar and sparkling water – interesting times indeed!

Brand Love What makes it RealFeeling

 “What brands can do brilliantly is broker change in people’s lives.” John Grant, co-founder, St Luke’s

“Feeling” encompasses brand ethos. This includes values, authenticity, trust and (becoming crucial), being committed to visibly doing good, benefiting a cause outside of the product itself.

A brand whose “feeling” or commitment marketing is outstanding is Unilever  – promoting their green eco ethos (over product) in an ongoing series of beautifully designed communications.

In closing: All of these “brand love” realities will change to a greater or lesser degree, even in the short term. As traditional marketing audiences fragment, integrated and holistic campaigns need to look at incorporating all of these motivators. This is more important now than ever before.

Sheila McGillivray, Tribe Leader

Meet our Tribe Leader: Sheila McGillivray

By | Food for thought

Meet our Tribe Leader Sheila McGillivraySheila McGillivray started in the advertising world in the late ‘60s, building knowledge and experience that spanned continents and spheres of influence.

Her agency, One Lady and a Tribe, has, over a relatively short period, built a reputation for tackling projects with passion and determination and delivering results.

Sheila’s portfolio over the years has included a multitude of prestigious accounts, including Hyperama, for whom she produced South Africa’s first live TV commercial concept with M Net – CNA, Edgars and Boardmans, Mazda, Amstel  and many more.

After several years in various agencies, Sheila decided to start  her own company, and her passion for Cause Marketing  is demonstrated in the amazing results achieved with the Centrum Guardian Project, an initiative with Centrum Multivitamin from Pfizer Consumer Healthcare. The campaign has earned accolades on a local and global scale and demonstrates the agency belief in Cause Marketing. Doing good and doing good business.

We chatted to this amazing Tribe and Thought Leader to get her take on things affecting the advertising industry and more. Here’s what Sheila had to say:

Integration is something that is affecting all marketing considerations now. The fragmentation of audiences means that integrated campaigns are more important now than they have ever been. The complexity of the modern audience also demands integration for an effective campaign.

Consumer Activism can’t be ignored. There’s no doubt that consumers now hold all the cards and social activism has been gaining momentum since the dawn of social media. Brands have no where to hide.

In the last ten years, major brands have lost market share to entrepreneurial brands who know how to hustle – we call this the David and Goliath Syndrome.

No longer is their biggest competition the number 1 or number 2 brand in the category. Now, they’re threatened by the dreaded “all the other,” a collection of brands that  often aren’t even listed by name on a market share report, because they’re viewed as too small to matter. Let’s be straight. They matter.

Who do I admire? People who plant trees under whose shade they may never sit and I believe that mentorship is essential for the next generation of communication gurus.

My favourite words to live are: “I shall pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can do or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.”